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How to Price your Artwork sensibly so it sells

You are the best judge of your art, undoubtedly, but when you are putting it out for sale, you need to consider several perspectives than yours’ alone. Here are a few insights to help you decide in the most sensible manner

Basic Art Pricing Fundamentals:

Step 1: Define your market. Where do you sell your art? Do you sell locally, regionally, nationally or internationally? The art, artists and prices in your market are the ones you should pay the most attention to.

Step 2: Define your type of art. What kind of art do you make? What are its physical characteristics? In what ways is it similar to other art? How do you categorize it? If you paint abstracts, for example, what kind of abstracts, how would you describe them? This is the type of art that you want to generally focus on for comparison purposes.

Step 3: Determine which artists make art similar to yours either by researching online or visiting galleries, open studios or other venues and seeing their work in person. Pay particular attention to those artists who also have career accomplishments similar to yours, who’ve been making art about as long as you have, showing about as long as you have, selling about as long as you have and so on.

Step 4: See how much these similar artists charge for their art. Their prices will be good initial estimates of the prices you should charge for your art.

What you should do

Think like an employer

Here’s a simple formula to start with. You need to hire yourself and decide for a reasonable wage for creating that artwork.

Pay yourself a reasonable hourly wage, add the cost of materials and make that your asking price. For example, if materials cost Rs.1000, you take 20 hours to make the art, and you pay yourself Rs.1000 an hour to make it, then you price the art at Rs.21,000 (Rs1000 X 20 hours + Rs1000 cost of materials).

Think like a businessman

You need to have a basic understanding of how the art business works and how collectors/art-buyers shop and buy. Evaluate the significance and quality of your art in relation to the vast quantity and variety of art that’s on display and available for sale.  The price quoted by you should be approximately in the same range as your ‘comparables’.

For example- If the price quoted by your ‘comparables’ are in the range of Rs10,000 to Rs. 35,000 and you have a comparatively lighter portfolio in terms of number of years, previous work sale history etc., you should price your artwork approximately between Rs.10,000 to Rs. 15,000

And when you price by comparison, compare to what sells and not to what doesn’t.

Think like an Artist

No matter how you set your prices, be competitive. It can’t be too high or too low. Be realistic, price it for the worth of it. When you price your art, you must be able to show that your prices make sense, that they’re fair and justified with respect to certain art criteria such as the depth of your resume, your previous sales history and the particulars of the market where you sell.

What you shouldn’t do

Common mistakes artists make when setting prices
  1. Too much attention on yourself and pricing what you feel right instead of comparing it with the standard market trend.
  2. The mistake of equating price values with vague or psychological factors like how emotionally attached they are to various works of their art or how much angst they experienced while creating them. Placing special meanings and therefore special asking prices on certain pieces that may make sense to you alone but have little or no relation to the selling prices of your art in general. If your buyer doesn’t understand art prices, they tend to shy away.

And lastly, try to offer something for everyone. There might be people out there who love your art and are your biggest fan but can’t afford it. But they should also at least have the chance to take back home a little something. Who knows? They may one day be able to afford your top-of-the-line masterworks.

Want to sell your art? Visit http://www.artoreal.com/

How to Photograph your Artwork better

So you have created an artwork and now want to sell it? Then you might also know how important it is to photograph your artwork in the correct manner so that it makes an impression out there in the market.

We have compiled a list of valuable tips for you to photograph your artwork better, so that it sells better.

Rules of Product Photography

1. Contrast & Clean Background – black/ white

A white background is a mandate. Majority of the products are shot against white backgrounds as this takes any distractions away, so the only thing to look at is the product! Shooting against a white background also means the product is easier to ‘cut out’ in Photoshop if needed. Try using a white sheet, or pieces of white cardboard to create a mini studio. You can also alternatively try a black background. The objective remains to draw all the attention on the artwork/product and nothing else.

2. No Shadow Rule

While photographing your artwork, you should use multiple light sources so as to avoid any kind of shadows on the artwork. Light should always be diffused so that it spreads evenly and doesn’t alter the original color of the artwork. The idea is to get the product fairly evenly lit, avoiding harsh shadows, so make sure you set up in a room with bright lights, or has bright ambient light coming through the windows. And when taking your shots use a flash as well to fill in the shadows but on-camera or direct flash should be avoided.

3. Various faces of the artwork

You should cover your artwork from multiple angles – top approach, side approach. Captures should happen from almost every possible angle because it is only this photograph through which your artwork/product is going to make an impression on its prospective buyer. Most of the websites which allow you to sell your artwork demand for at least four to five pictures of the artwork. And off course lighting needs to be adjusted with every angle that you are capturing.

4. Camera Settings

Aperture of the camera should more than f8 to ensure sharpness of the picture –The camera should ideally be placed on a tripod or any standstill ground like a table etc. to get absolute still pictures. This is important so that when your product picture is zoomed out, it doesn’t give a hazy/foggy picture.

5. Polish till the original stays intact

Post processing is a necessity; we know that- but you also need to keep the picture as realistic as possible because you don’t want the buyer to feel a drastic difference between the photograph and the original product, Beautifying is good but only till the extent that it doesn’t change the originality.  So you can adjust brightness and contrast kind of basic things but not go overboard!

Five Essential Points to Consider Before you Start Selling your Art

So you are an artist and you want to sell your art? Great!
But you are a newbie in this field and you don’t know how to! Not so great…
The good news is, we are here to help you out!

With our brand new e-commerce website www.tumbhimall.com which focuses on selling unique art to art lovers, we have compiled a list of valuable tips for you to get useful insights about this phenomenon

1. Understand your Art

First touch point is to know what you are selling here. If it is a painting, ask yourself below questions:

  • What kind of painting is it ? Nature landscape or portrait or Still life or Illustration or Sketch or Folk Art etc.; have you used any specific technique or is it your own style?
  • What is the medium it is in? Have you used a canvas or wood or paper
  • What is the size in scale of your art? Is it a small A4 size or a big bulky frame?
  • What according would be the best price of your artwork?

2. Who is your Target Audience?

After understanding your art, it’s time to understand the people you want to sell it to. Not anyone will buy anything. There are going to be specific segments of buyers who will be interested in your art. For e.g. a homemaker might be interested in a folk art or religious art for home décor, whereas a youngster might indulge in quirky pop-art poster. Understanding your audience will also be influenced by the size of your art – a big bulky painting will attract buyers with bigger homes and deeper pockets, similarly unframed pictures can be easily picked by middle class art lovers.

3. Face value is market value – Positioning your Art

#Photograph- Stick to “Jo dikhta hai , wo bikta hai” mantra! Understand the importance of creating a positive first impression and convert it into sales. Since you are an online seller, photographing your art/product is going to be the most important aspect. It’s advisable to hire a professional product photographer to do so. If that is not possible ask a friend with a decent camera to help you with it. Focus on the lighting so that every color, every stroke of your art is clearly visible. Remember, a tacky photo will shut all the opportunities of your art getting sold.

#Price- what according would be the best price of your artwork?

#Title – what is the name you have given to your artwork? Have you titled it too randomly that your prospective buyers will not be able to find or understand it on the website? We suggest you to keep it standard- generic but attractive. This will make it easier for people looking for a specific kind of artwork. For e.g. If it’s a painting of Buddha you can use a title like “Peaceful Buddha” which is both generic and attractive.

4. Why should people buy your art?

This point is going to test your writing skills just like photography section. But it is very crucial since this is the only scope of connecting with your buyers, making them understand your work so that they end up buying it! You simply need to write the story behind the Art and give the buyer more reasons to bring it home. A long essay is not required; a simple explanation in 2-3 lines about the inspiration or meaning of the art should work just fine.

 

 

5. Where can they buy it?

Since you are selling your art on the website, your customers have to come to the website. Your job here is to bring them to the website where your art is. Word of mouth till date is the best way of marketing, hence spread the word in your network! Making the marketplace popular will only benefit you in the longer since the probability of getting more and more visiting buyers will increase the chances of getting your own art sold.

 

 

If these insights were helpful you can register yourself as a seller on our exclusive website for Artists to sell their Art www.tumbhimall.com and start your commercial artistic journey today

Photography Workshop with Vincent Versace – Few Tips

Are you the kind of photographer who carries a big back pack filled with several cameras, lenses and other photography gears? Are you also worried more about the scratch on of any of your precious photography armors rather than worrying about that delicate little souvenir carried back home?

Vincent Versace, the Nikon Ambassador for US shares a few handy tips in his one day photography workshop at Mumbai with Tumbhi!

1. Shower Caps

They act like the perfect raincoat for most of your cameras and lenses. With their elastic wide enough to hold any size of head, they prevent your cameras thereby also protecting them from any water drop or scratches!

So the next time you are visiting a hotel room, don’t forget to throw in a few complimentary shower caps!

 

2. Lens cleanser

‘Hoodman ‘an enzyme based lens cleanser is what Vincent prescribes. You do realize keeping the lens clean is as necessary as wiping off your eye glasses clean- to give a clearer view and thus a better photograph. Like wet wipes this cleanser is easy to carry and use. Available at Amazon this will sure give you a clearer lens if not a photograph!

3. Torch

A torch is to not only show you your ways through uneven plateaus of that deadly forest for wildlife photography , but also when you need that “little extra sunlight” on the object of your photograph. A 4 spectrum light bulb (battery operated) is what Vincent prescribes.

4: Wrist Strap

A wrist strap, mostly that one used by sports persons is to keep your hand anti-shake while you click that amazing rare moment. It stiffens the wrist and ensures that you don’t get disappointed with a great yet blur picture.

 

 

 

 

 

5. Shade Card

A simple shade card will enable you to have the idea of that perfect shade of ‘grey’ while clicking Black & White photographs. A simple yet very effective technique to determine the desired shade of color in your finished photograph while clicking itself.

6. CamRanger

A CamRanger wirelessly tethers your Nikon or Canon DSLR with your iPad or iPhone. So basically you keep your camera at the set angle and click with your iphone or ipad in hand without pressing the button of your camera. Its best when you need to click secretly without scaring away the subject of your photograph. See more about CamRanger here http://www.camranger.com/

7. Battery Chargers

And last but the most essential, the batter chargers! Generally photographers carry lot of batteries but one or two chargers! That’s a big NO! Carry enough battery chargers in proportion to the batteries you are carrying! You can’t let go of a rare moment just because of a stupid battery you see.

Hope a few of these tips will come in as handy to you as they were meant to be.

Overview:

Vincent Versace is an internationally recognized pioneer in the art and science of digital photography. His passion for natural light photography is manifest not only in his work but also through his role as a creative and technical leader, contributing to innovative breakthroughs across the entire digital image value chain.

Vincent has recently conducted a series of Photography Workshops in India in association with Tumbhi! A three day workshop in Banaras (Sept 20-22) and one day workshop at Mumbai (Sept 26) along with a photography tour in Meerzapur (U.P.).

To remain updated with Vincent’s future programs in India, stay tuned with us on Facebook and Twitter.